Thursday, November 18, 2010

Freedom Is Rebellion

     OK so, you're at work when someone says, "They're supposed to do that, but they didn't." Probably happened to you before, right? Now, think: would you be surprised that the person who is supposed to do something didn't? Probably not. In fact, if you had acted surprised they would be utterly confused. I mean, the fact that you don't have to do what you ought to do should be very surprising, considering. It doesn't naturally follow that if you are supposed to do something that you might not do it. This is unnatural, illogical, even. "Of course they didn't have to do it, I'm just saying they were supposed to." If something should happen, subsequently it ought to happen. If something is supposed to happen, and it didn't, then something has gone very wrong. 

     Even so, in the human mindset, to expect that someone necessarily do what they are supposed to do is next to insanity. Not that they would do what they're supposed to, that's not craziness, but that, logically, one must do exactly what they ought to—that's craziness. This is very revealing of the essential fact that humans are rebellious to the absolute core. That we think it crazy to believe that there is no other rational option but to do what is essentially our duty shows that rebellion is a simple fluid product of our very nature. It is so perfectly natural to us to choose to do or not do what we should that anything else is unthinkable. 

     Why should it be a surprise, then, that people are remarkably put off by the idea that man has no say in whether he is saved—no choice in his salvation? This also may suggest as to why the humble repentant Christian goes overboard when he learns of the sovereignty of God in salvation written in the scriptures. So, when he learns that he was chosen by God, and not vice-versa, he starts to see, in fact, the necessity of carrying out oughtness is righteousness and all else is rebellion.